Quick Animation on How the NHS in England Works (King’s Fund / CreativeConnection)

Summary

The King’s Fund has produced an animated video, and a brief accompanying slide-set, which provide a quick overview of how the NHS “works”, in terms of evolving structure and the functional inter-relationships between the many component parts.

Full Text Link

Reference

Mantell, K. (2017). How does the NHS in England work? An alternative guide. Animation. London: The King’s Fund [and] CreativeConnection, October 19th 2017.

The full-blown overview image is available for download. Fleetingly, it all seems to make sense.

“NHS organograms explain how providers are regulated and commissioned, and how the money flows”.

Full Text Link

Reference

The NHS: how providers are regulated and commissioned. Presentation slide set. London: The King’s Fund, October 2017.

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Posted in Acute Hospitals, Charitable Bodies, Commissioning, Community Care, CQC: Care Quality Commission, Department of Health, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, King's Fund, Local Interest, National, NHS, NHS England, Quick Insights, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Systems Thinking For NHS Quality Improvement (NHS Improvement)

Summary

The following report explores how an engineering (sic “systems”) approach to service re-design could contribute to quality improvement in health and social care.

Full Text Link

Reference

Engineering better care: a systems approach to health and care design and continuous improvement. London: NHS Improvement [and] Royal Academy of Engineering, October 2017.

Posted in Commissioning, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Integrated Care, Management of Condition, National, NHS, Quick Insights, Royal College of Physicians, Standards | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

BBC’s NHS Tracker Service: Re-Launched (BBC News)

Summary

The BBC has launched a new improved version of the online NHS Tracker, in readiness for anticipated Winter-pressures. This service allows local variations in service performance to be viewed by postcode. Updates will be added to reflect monthly and quarterly data releases. The NHS Tracker supplies information on the local status of three hospital waiting time targets:

  • Four-hour A&E waiting time target performance.
  • 62-day cancer care waiting time target performance.
  • Planned operations and treatment waiting time target performance.

Full Text Link

Reference

Triggle, N. (2017). Hospital targets missed en masse as performance slumps. [Re-titled subsequently to: NHS waits for cancer care, A&E and ops worsen across UK]. London: BBC Health News, October 18th 2017.

See also:

Full Text Link

Reference

Check NHS cancer, A&E and operations targets in your area. London: BBC Health News, October 17th 2017.

Service performance quality has slumped, apparently. Further BBC News commentary:

Full Text Link

Reference

Triggle, N. (2017). Does it matter if NHS targets are missed? London: BBC Health News, October 18th 2017.

Some observers doubt whether all hospital targets could ever be met:

Full Text Link

Reference

Triggle, N. (2017). NHS Tracker: five things we’ve learned. London: BBC Health News, October 19th 2017.

Related stories:

Full Text Link

Reference

Pym, H. (2017). The tale of two hospitals. London: BBC Health News, October 18th 2017.

An atypical case-study?:

Full Text Link

Reference

Silver, K. (2017). ‘I spent my savings rather than wait for the NHS’. London: BBC Health News, October 18th 2017.

Posted in Acute Hospitals, BBC News, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, Local Interest, Management of Condition, National, NHS, Northern Ireland, Quick Insights, Scotland, Standards, Statistics, UK, Universal Interest, Wales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

European Study of Unpaid Dementia Carer Burden (JAMDA)

Summary

The following article covers a study of people with dementia and their informal carers supported by community services (whether living at home or receiving day care or respite care) across eight European countries. The investigation explored any association(s) between carer-burden and the characteristics of (i) the informal carer, (ii) the person with dementia, and (iii) the care support network available. The aim is to supply appropriately tailored interventions to reduce the burden of care by supporting informal carers of people with dementia who are struggling on the margins of admission into long-term care.

Full Text Link

Reference

Sutcliffe C. Giebel, C. [and] Bleijlevens, M. [et al]; RightTimePlaceCare Consortium (2017). Caring for a person with dementia on the margins of long-term care: a perspective on burden from 8 European countries. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association (JAMDA): the Journal of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. July 18th 2017. S1525-8610(17)30311-0. [Epub ahead of print].

Posted in Commissioning, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Integrated Care, International, Management of Condition, Mental Health, Models of Dementia Care, Person-Centred Care, Personalisation, Quick Insights, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Cancer Drugs Often Bestow Little Benefit Regarding Survival or Wellbeing (NHS Choices / BMJ)

Summary

A quotation from the authors’ abstract may say it all:

“This systematic evaluation of oncology approvals by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2009-13 shows that most drugs entered the market without evidence of benefit on survival or quality of life. At a minimum of 3.3 years after market entry, there was still no conclusive evidence that these drugs either extended or improved life for most cancer indications. When there were survival gains over existing treatment options or placebo, they were often marginal”.

Full Text Link

Reference

Many new cancer drugs show ‘no clear benefit’, argues review. London: NHS Choices; Behind the Headlines, October 5th 2017.

This relates to:

Full Text Link (Note: This article is available freely at present, but may soon require a suitable Athens password, a journal subscription or payment for access).

Reference

Davis, C. Naci, H. [and] Gurpinar, E. [et al] (2017). Availability of evidence of benefits on overall survival and quality of life of cancer drugs approved by European Medicines Agency: retrospective cohort study of drug approvals 2009-13. BMJ. October 4th 2017; 359: j4530.

Posted in Commissioning, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, International, Management of Condition, NHS Choices, Pharmacological Treatments, Quick Insights, Statistics, Systematic Reviews, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Helping People With Dementia to Stay at Home (Housing LIN / DHWG / Halsall Lloyd Partnership)

Summary

Earlier research indicated 85% of people would wish to remain at home for as long as possible when given a diagnosis of dementia. A report published last month covers how housing providers (social housing providers in particular) might support people with dementia to remain independent in homes of their own choosing.

Full Text Link

Reference

Are we nearly there yet? Enabling people with dementia to remain at home: a housing perspective. [Online]: Housing Learning and Improvement Network, September 14th 2017.

This relates to:

Full Text Link

Reference

Garwood, S. Are we nearly there yet? Enabling people with dementia to remain at home: a housing perspective. [London]: Housing Learning and Improvement Network, September 2017.

There is also an Executive Summary.

“ …this report has been produced on behalf of the Dementia and Housing Working Group, and supported by partners Homeless Link, Foundations and the Life Story Network”.

Design For Dementia

A serendipitous discovery:

Full Text Link

Reference

Halsall, B. [and] MacDonald, R. (2015). Design for dementia. Volume 1: a guide. Liverpool: Halsall Lloyd Partnership, 2015.

Full Text Link

Reference

Halsall, B. [and] MacDonald, R. (2015). Design for dementia. Volume 2: research projects. Liverpool: Halsall Lloyd Partnership, 2015.

Posted in Assistive Technology, Charitable Bodies, Commissioning, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Housing, Housing LIN, In the News, Integrated Care, Management of Condition, Models of Dementia Care, National, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Personalisation, Quick Insights, Standards, Telecare, Telehealth, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Latest CQC State of Care Report (BBC News / CQC / File on Four)

Summary

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) annual State of Care report assesses the overall status of health and social care in England. The head of the CQC has alleged that parts of the NHS and social care may soon be “straining at the seams” and facing a “precarious” future”. Likely crisis points include:

  • Staff shortages: NHS vacancy rates have increased by 16% over the past two years despite the 4% increase in staff.
  • Hospital bed shortages: with bed occupancy levels above recommended levels since April 2012.
  • Fewer nursing homes beds: a decline of 4,000 over two years, despite rising demand.
  • Fewer people receiving support for social care needs: higher by 18% over last year.
  • Detentions under the Mental Health Act: increased by one fifth over two years (over 63,000 detentions last year).

Full Text Link

Reference

Triggle, N. (2017). NHS future precarious, says regulator. London: BBC Health News, October 10th 2017.

“ …the NHS is struggling to cope with 21st century problems including increasing numbers of people with illnesses linked to unhealthy lifestyle choices like obesity, diabetes, dementia and heart disease”. Sir David Behan (CQC).

See also:

Full Text Link

Reference

State of Care. [Online]: Care Quality Commission, October 10th 2017.

This relates to:

Full Text Link

Reference

The state of health care and adult social care in England: 2016/17. Presented to Parliament pursuant to section 83(4)(a) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008. HC 377. Newcastle upon Tyne: Care Quality Commission, October 9th 2017.

There is also an executive summary.

Ongoing Questions About Hospital Care Quality for the Elderly

A probing investigation into the variable quality of elderly / dementia care in some NHS hospitals:

Full Text of Transcript / Audio Link

Reference

Elderly Patients in Hospital – Who Cares? London: BBC Radio Four’s “File on Four” programme, October 10th 2017 [and] October 15th 2017.

Posted in Acute Hospitals, BBC News, Commissioning, Community Care, CQC: Care Quality Commission, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Local Interest, Management of Condition, National, NHS, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Patient Care Pathway, Person-Centred Care, Quick Insights, Standards, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment