Football and Dementia Risk: Mortality From Neurodegenerative Disease Higher in Former Professional Soccer Players (BBC News / Drake Foundation / NEJM)

Summary

The Football’s InfluencE on Lifelong health and Dementia risk (FIELD) study, based at Glasgow University and supported by The Football Association and The Professional Footballers’ Association, found that former Scottish professional football players tend to be over 3.5 times more like to die with dementia, and over 5 times more likely to die with Alzheimer’s Disease, than the general population. Mortality with Parkinson’s Disease is 2 times higher in ex-players.

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Reference

Dementia in football: Ex-players three and a half times more likely to die of condition. London: BBC Sport / BBC Health News, October 21st 2019.

See also:

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Reference

Football and dementia: former players over five times more likely to die of Alzheimer’s, says landmark study. [Online]: Drake Foundation, October 21st 2019.

This relates to:

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Reference

Mackay, DF. Russell, ER. [and] Stewart, K. [et al] (2019). Neurodegenerative disease mortality among former professional soccer players. New England Journal of Medicine. October 21st 2019. [Epub ahead of print].

There is a list of related Glasgow Brain Injury Research Group publications.

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Posted in BBC News, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), In the News, National, Parkinson's Disease, Quick Insights, Scotland, Statistics, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Annual Care Quality Commission State of Care Report (BBC News / CQC / Healthwatch)

Summary

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) recently released the annual State of Care review. It concludes that most care provided across England is of good quality and improving. Community care services need to be improved. Innovations in new approaches to care should be supported. The main section headings in this report cover:

  • Part 1: The State of Care in England 2018/19.
    • People struggle to get access to the care they need and want.
    • Integration and innovation are at the heart of better care.
  • Part 2: The Sectors CQC Regulates.
    • Adult social care.
    • Hospitals, community health and ambulance services.
    • Mental health care.
    • Primary medical services.
    • Equality in health and social care.
  • The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.
  • Appendix: Overall sector ratings.

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Reference

More than half of A&Es ‘not good enough’. London: BBC Health News, October 15th 2019.

This relates to:

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The state of health care and adult social care in England 2018/19. London: Care Quality Commission (CQC), October 2019.

“More and better community services are needed to help people avoid crisis situations”. p.7

There is an Executive Summary. There is also an Easy Read version.

Related Background Information From Healthwatch England

“Healthwatch England has suggested that fewer than half of all people with dementia, who use social care, are getting the regular care reviews they are entitled to as part of the support they receive from councils. p.12.

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Reference

Why it’s important to review the care of people with dementia. [Online]: Healthwatch England, July 1st 2019.

Earlier Age UK Research: Cited by CQC Report

“More older people than ever are missing out on the vital care and support they need, and delayed hospital discharges due to a lack of social care are costing the NHS a staggering £500 a minute, new analysis by Age UK has highlighted”.

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Reference

1.4 million older people aren’t getting the care and support they need – a staggering increase of almost 20% in just two years. [Online]: Age UK, July 9th 2018.

Posted in Acute Hospitals, Age UK, BBC News, Commissioning, Community Care, CQC: Care Quality Commission, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, Local Interest, Management of Condition, Mental Health, National, NHS, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Personalisation, Quick Insights, Standards, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Consensus Statement on Healthy Ageing (PHE / CfAB)

Summary

Public Health England and the Centre for Ageing Better have released a consensus statement, containing widely accepted proposals for making England the “best place in the world to grow old”. Five core principles are given, with the aim of inspiring action for improvement:

  1. Putting prevention first and ensuring timely access to services and support when needed.
  2. Removing barriers and creating more opportunities for older adults to contribute to society.
  3. Ensuring good homes and communities.
  4. Narrowing inequalities.
  5. Challenging ageist and negative language, culture and practices.

“Signatories span the areas of health, employment, housing and communities, and are from academia, local government, the NHS, and the public and voluntary sectors.”.

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Reference

Healthy ageing: consensus statement. [Online]: Public Health England [and] Centre for Ageing Better, October 16th 2019. PHE Publications Gateway No. GW-824.

Posted in Age UK, Alzheimer's Society, Alzheimer’s Research UK, Carers UK, Charitable Bodies, Commissioning, Community Care, Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Health Foundation, Integrated Care, Management of Condition, Mental Health Foundation, NHS England, NHS Improvement, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Public Health England, Royal College of Psychiatrists, SCIE, Standards, UK, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Walking Speed in Midlife: a Predictor of Physical and Mental Decline? (BBC News / JAMA Network Open)

Summary

Slow walking speed (“gait speed”) in mid-life appears to be an early warning sign of accelerated ageing. Slower walkers tend to display more signs of accelerated ageing in terms of various markers and measures (such as lung health, teeth, immune system, brain dimensions, weak grip strength, poor balance, poor visual-motor coordination, poor performance in the chair-stand test, older facial appearance, and possibly poor neurocognitive functioning / IQ); all of which variables are typically poorer than in persons who walk faster. Adult gait speed is associated with mid-life ageing and with brain health lifelong i.e. not merely in the later stages of life.

“ … measuring walking speed at a younger age could be a way of testing treatments to slow human ageing”.

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Reference

Roxby, P. (2019). Slow walking at 45 ‘a sign of faster ageing’. London: BBC Health News, October 12th 2019.

This relates to:

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Reference

Rasmussen, LJH. Caspi, A. [and] Ambler, A. [et al] (2019). Association of neurocognitive and physical function with gait speed in midlife. JAMA Network Open. October 2nd 2019; Vol.2(10): e1913123.

Posted in BBC News, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), In the News, International, Quick Insights, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Resources and Announcements for World Mental Health Day (WHO / Public Health England / NHS England / DHSC / Mind)

Summary

There has been a flurry of new resources, announcements and initiatives in anticipation of World Mental Health Day, which falls on October 10th 2019.

Every Mind Matters: a Mental Health Hub for the General Public

Public Health England (PHE), in partnership with the NHS, has launched Every Mind Matters. This evidence-based resource has been designed to help people look after their own mental health / mental wellbeing and support other people. A PHE survey suggests that 83% people have experienced at least the early signs of poor mental health (including feeling anxious, stressed, having low mood or trouble sleeping) during the past year. The main sections cover:

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Reference

Groundbreaking new platform launched to support mental health. [Online]: Public Health England, October 7th 2019.

Centre for Internet and Gaming Disorders Launched

The Centre for Internet and Gaming Disorders, part of the National Centre for Behavioural Addictions, is to provide support for children and young adults seriously addicted to computer gaming / online gambling:

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Reference

Children to be treated for computer gaming addiction under NHS Long Term Plan. [Online]: NHS England, October 8th 2019.

Head 4 Health (Wolverhampton)

Head 4 Health is a Wolverhampton-based, Premier League and Professional Footballers Association funded, charitable scheme which helps to improve the mental and physical wellbeing of men over the age of 18. It is similar to “Men in Sheds”, using the Wolverhampton Wanderers Foundation Molineux facilities instead of sheds. There is an emphasis on raising mental health awareness, meeting other people in similar situations, cookery classes, coping with stress, loneliness, alcohol and gambling problems etc., and provision of a range of physical activity sessions.

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Reference

Head 4 Health. Wolverhampton: Wolves.co.uk / City of Wolverhampton Council Public Health [and] Wolverhampton CCG, 2019.

State of the Nation Report

A positive spin on child mental health in England:

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Reference

First ‘State of the Nation’ report marks World Mental Health Day. [Online]: Department for Education / Department of Health and Social Care / Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP [and] Rt Hon Gavin Williamson CBE MP, October 10th 2019.

This relates to:

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Reference

State of the nation 2019: children and young people’s wellbeing. London: Department for Education, October 2019.

Independent Oversight Group to Improve Young People’s Community Mental Health Services and Reduce Over Reliance on Inpatient Care

Concerning a new NHS taskforce to improve specialist children and young people’s inpatient mental health, autism and learning disability services in England:

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Reference

NHS taskforce to drive improvements in young people’s hospital mental health, learning disability and autism care. [Online]: NHS England, October 10th 2019.

Guidance on Developing Local Plans for Mental Health Services (Mind)

A recent report from the charity Mind assists local STPs with their plans regarding mental health priorities. Topics included in the NHS Long Term Plan include support for pregnant women and new mothers (perinatal mental health), improvements to community-based mental health care, and improving access to treatments for young people.

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Reference

Transforming mental health in your community: a local guide to delivering the NHS long-term plan. London: Mind, October 2019.

NHS England’s Community Mental Health Framework

The Community Mental Health Framework outlines plans for transformative change in the design of community mental health care. The aim is to move away from siloed, “difficult-to-access” services towards better joined-up care and whole population approaches to mental health. It involves a place-based community mental health model which aligns community-based services with Primary Care Networks.

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Reference

The community mental health framework for adults and older adults. London: NHS England / NHS Improvement and the National Collaborating Central for Mental Health, September 29th 2019.

Full implementation guidance for the Community Mental Health Framework for Adults and Older Adults will be available from the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

Concerns About NHS Infrastructure Investment?

While Prime Minister Boris Johnson recently pledged funding to six trusts for new hospital facilities, none of these were mental health trusts:

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Reference

Ford, M. (2019). Warning over ‘long-term neglect’ of mental health NHS estate. Nursung Times. October 7th 2019.

Homelessness: Improved Mental Health Outreach for Rough Sleepers

Co-ordinated outreach support for rough sleepers aims to improve access to: mental health support, existing outreach services for the homeless, accommodation services, drug and alcohol support, and other physical healthcare services.

“The new NHS-led teams will bring together doctors, nurses and other clinicians to co-ordinate treatment and support with other local organisations including councils”.

The initial £12 million funding over the next five years will be used to develop comprehensive services across seven pilot areas (Birmingham, Brighton, Hull, Lincoln, Lambeth, Luton and Haringey). About 20 areas with high levels of rough sleeping are expected to have such teams by 2023/24; with national roll-out, backed by £30 million, as specified in the NHS Long Term Plan.

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Reference

Rough sleepers in homeless hotspots to benefit from NHS mental health outreach. [Online]: NHS England, October 14th 2019.

NHS Practitioner Health

NHS doctors and dentists in England have 24/7 access to confidential a comprehensive mental health advice and support service via NHS Practitioner Health.

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Reference

Dedicated mental health support for all NHS doctors and dentists. London: Department for Health and Social Care, October 21st 2019.

Posted in Charitable Bodies, Commissioning, Community Care, Department of Health, Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, International, Local Interest, Management of Condition, Mental Health, National, NHS, NHS England, NHS Improvement, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Public Health England, Quick Insights, Statistics, UK, Universal Interest, Wolverhampton, World Health Organization (WHO) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quality Improvement: Strategies Needed to Reduce Preventable Patient Harm (NIHR Signal / BMJ / Future Healthcare Journal / WHO)

Summary

A recent review found that around 6% patients in healthcare settings (internationally) experience potentially preventable harm; with approximately 1 in 8 such cases resulting in severe harm, permanent disability or death​

“Six types of patient harm were identified: drug management incidents (recorded in 25% of the preventable harm cases), other therapeutic management incidents (24%), procedural incidents (23%), surgical procedure incidents (23%), healthcare infections (16%), and diagnosis incidents (16%)”.

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Reference

Vincent, C. (2019). Better strategies are needed to reduce preventable patient harm in healthcare. London: NIHR Signal / NIHR Dissemination Centre, October 2nd 2019.

This relates to:

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Reference

Panagioti, M., Khan, K. [and] Keers, RN. [et al] (2019). Prevalence, severity, and nature of preventable patient harm across medical care settings: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ: British Medical Journal. July 17th 2019; Vol.366: l4185.

Quality improvement work is underway throughout the NHS to reduce avoidable patient harm and the wasted resources arising from attempts to correct such harm after the event. Possibly of interest:

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Reference

Huntley, C. (2019). Laying the foundations for quality improvement within an NHS trust: a chief registrar’s journey. Future Healthcare Journal. June 2019; Vol.6, Supplement 2: 66.

An International Perspective: Ten Facts About Hospital Care

Quotation:

  • Fact 1: One in every 10 patients is harmed while receiving hospital care.
  • Fact 2: The occurrence of adverse events due to unsafe care is likely one of the 10 leading causes of death and disability across the world.
  • Fact 3: Four out of every 10 patients are harmed in primary and outpatient health care.
  • Fact 4: At least 1 out of every 7 Canadian dollars is spent treating the effects of patient harm in hospital care.
  • Fact 5: Investment in patient safety can lead to significant financial savings.
  • Fact 6: Unsafe medication practices and medication errors harm millions of patients and costs billions of US dollars every year.
  • Fact 7: Inaccurate or delayed diagnosis is one of the most common causes of patient harm and affects millions of patients.
  • Fact 8: Hospital infections affect up to 10 out of every 100 hospitalized patients.
  • Fact 9: More than 1 million patients die annually from complications due to surgery.
  • Fact 10: Medical exposure to radiation is a public health and patient safety concern.

Full Text Link

Reference

WHO (2019). 10 facts on patient safety. Geneva: World Health Organization, Updated August / September 2019.

Posted in Acute Hospitals, Commissioning, Community Care, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), Integrated Care, International, NHS, NHS England, NHS Improvement, NIHR, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Pharmacological Treatments, Quick Insights, Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, Systematic Reviews, UK, Universal Interest, World Health Organization (WHO) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Holistic Consideration of Apathy in Dementia (Journal of the American Geriatrics Society)

Summary

A recent review of apathy proposes an integrative (holistic) model for understanding the condition, in common with other forms of BPSD.

“As with other BPSD, …neural mechanisms alone do not completely account for the syndrome – individual, caregiver and environmental factors also contribute to apathy”.

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Reference

Massimo, L. Kales, HC. [and] Kolanowski, A. (2018). State of the science: apathy as a model for investigating behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. April 2018; Vol.66, Supplement 1: S4-S12.

Posted in Depression, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), Integrated Care, International, Mental Health, Models of Dementia Care, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Pharmacological Treatments, Quick Insights, Systematic Reviews, Universal Interest | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment