Enhanced Domiciliary Care for People With Dementia: Waveney, Suffolk

Summary

The provision of an enhanced and flexible domiciliary care service, for people with dementia at times of crisis or strain, is designed to allow the opportunity for situations to stabilise and permit careful assessment of each person’s current needs. It supports vulnerable people to maintain their independence, before they can be handed back to mainstream domiciliary care.

The service prevents inappropriate admissions to hospital or residential services. Breakdowns in family care arrangements may also be avoided, as may safeguarding issues including abuse and self-harm.

An independent domiciliary care agency operates the service. The service works with the Older People’s Mental Health Social Work service which acts as a gatekeeper. The hand-back to mainstream services is managed by clear gate-keeping criteria for admission to the service, with the explicit expectation that it remains a short-term service. This is facilitated by regular dialogue between gatekeepers, the service and mainstream services. There is close working between provider and assessor services.

The agency recruited and trained staff to work on the referrals it receives. This skilled and flexible workforce provides a “same-day” service, including “live-in” care for the period of crisis. The reduction in hospital admissions supports the business case for joint funding of this service.

Contact: John Lambert, Suffolk Adult Community Services (Email: John.lambert@suffolk.gov.uk).

Read more: NHS Great Yarmouth and Waveney Dementia Strategic Action Plan. Norfolk and Suffolk, July 2010.

The above information is taken from:

Full Text Link

Reference

Suarez, P. and Farrington-Douglas, J. (2010). Acute awareness: improving hospital care for people with dementia. London: The NHS Confederation, 2010.

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Community Care, For Social Workers (mostly), Quick Insights, Universal Interest and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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