Prevalence: 25% People with Parkinson’s Disease Without Dementia Have Mild Cognitive Impairment

[This abstract first appeared in: Dementia: the Latest Evidence Newsletter RWHT Volume 1 Issue 7 February 2011].

Abstract

This international study investigated the frequency of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) without dementia. Although different tests of cognitive assessment were sometimes used it was possible to group these into three cognitive domains: attention/executive function, memory or visuospatial function. Participants were also assessed for depression.

Out of the 1346 people included in the analysis 347 (25.8%, 95% CI 23.5% to 28.2%) were classified as having MCI. Memory impairment was experienced by 13.3% of participants, visuospatial impairment affected 11.0%, and impairments in attention/executive function affected 10.1% of participants.

People with MCI tended to be older, have an older age of onset of PD, have a longer disease duration, have worse motor function, have greater disease severity and be more likely to use dopamine agonists. People with MCI were more likely to have depression.

Future studies of people with PD and MCI are needed to establish risk factors for cognitive decline and assess interventions at the pre-dementia stage.

Full Text Link (a)

Reference

McKinlay, A. (2011). A quarter of people with Parkinson’s disease without dementia have mild cognitive impairment. Evidence Based Mental Health, 2011, February 2011, Vol.14(1), p.5.

Full Text Link (b)

Reference

Aarsland, D. Bronnick, K. [and] Williams-Gray, C. [et al] (2010). Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease: a multicenter pooled analysis. Neurology, 2010, Vol.75, pp.1062–9.

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in For Doctors (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), International, Parkinson's Disease, Universal Interest and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.