Cognitive Rehabilitation in Elderly Patients with a Diagnosis of Dementia (BestBets / Cochrane / BMJ / BMC Geriatrics)

Summary

This mini-systematic review from BestBets addresses a three-part question: does a cognitive rehabilitation programme for a population of elderly adults with a diagnosis of dementia actually improve their ability with activities of daily living?

This review concludes that there are no significant positive or negative effects of cognitive rehabilitation training on ability with ADL in adults with dementia. This conclusion is based on a Cochrane review indicating there are no significant positive or negative effects of cognitive training on patients’ ADL performance.

There were two individual studies from Zanetti [et al] (2001) and Graff [et al] (2006) which did indicate some improvement in ADL performance after occupational therapy, so the authors of the present review suggest there is a need for further research into this question.

Note: Two further references are offered below with a view to supporting this aim.

Read more: BestBets: Cognitive rehabilitation with elderly patients with a diagnosis of dementia.

Reference

Central Manchester and Manchester Childrens Foundation NHS Trust Hospital and Community Team / Occupational Therapists (2011). Cognitive rehabilitation with elderly patients with a diagnosis of dementia. BestBets (online resource), June 2011.

Key References Cited in this Review:

Full Text Link (a)

Reference

Clare, L. Woods, RT. [and] Moniz Cook, ED. [et al] (2003). Cognitive rehabilitation and cognitive training for early-stage Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Online), 2003, Issue 4, No.CD003260. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

Full Text Link (b)

Reference

Graff, MJ. Vernooij-Dassen, MJ. [and] Thijssen, M. [et al] (2006). Community based occupational therapy for patients with dementia and their care givers: randomised controlled trial. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), December 9th 2006, Vol.333(7580), 1196. [Epub BMJ Online November 17th 2006, p.1-6]. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

Reference

Zanetti, O. Zanieri, GZ. [and] Di Giovanni, G, [et al] (2001). Effectiveness of procedural memory stimulation in mild Alzheimer’s disease patients: a controlled study. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation: an International Journal, 2001; Vol.11(3/4), pp.263-272.

Further References (Additional Related Research)

Full Text Link (c)

Reference

Voigt-Radloff, S. Graff, M. [and] Leonhart, R. [et al] (2009). WHEDA study: effectiveness of occupational therapy at home for older people with dementia and their caregivers – the design of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial evaluating a Dutch programme in seven German centres. BMC Geriatrics, October 2nd 2009, Vol.9, 44. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

Full Text Link (d)

Reference

Graff, MJ. Adang, EM. [and] Vernooij-Dassen, MJ. [et al] (2008). Community occupational therapy for older patients with dementia and their care givers: cost effectiveness study. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), January 19th 2008, Vol.336(7636), pp.134-8. [Epub: January 2nd 2008]. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Community Care, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), Physiotherapy, Proposed for Next Newsletter, Systematic Reviews, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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