Reablement Guides (SCIE)

Summary

Reablement teams across the UK support people with a range of diagnoses, including some with dementia and sometimes people with end of life care needs. Reablement should result in better health and wellbeing, improve outcomes and reduce spending on ongoing support.

The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) has launched a series of briefings to support the implementation of reablement programmes. These “At a Glance” briefings offer practical information on delivering reablement. Case studies of people’s experiences of reablement are given with examples of successful reablement schemes.

Each briefing is targeted at a particular audience and has been written with a suitable partner organisation. 

Reablement: Key Issues for Commissioners of Adult Social Care

This guide, produced with the Association of Directors of Adult Services, shows

  1. No single delivery model exists. Many teams have developed from services such as in-house home care.
  2. Government investment in reablement could result in more joint working and funding between health and local government.
  3. Assessment and goal planning are “integral” to people achieving their aims.
  4. Occupational therapists play an important role in the provision of reablement and can assist people with complex conditions.
  5. More evidence is needed into how reablement influences outcomes under different models.
  6. Customer satisfaction can be high from reablement services.
  7. Plenty of information is available to commissioners.

Full Text Link

Reference

Reablement: key issues for commissioners of adult social care. London: Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) / ADASS Older Persons Network, March 2012. (SCIE At a Glance No.52).

Reablement: Implications for GPs and Primary Care

This guide, produced with the Clinical Innovation and Research Centre of the Royal College of General Practitioners, shows:

  1. Reablement focuses on restoring independence; not resolving health care issues.
  2. Reablement is cost-effective compared with conventional home care.
  3. The Secretary of State for Health wants clinical commissioning groups to embrace reablement.
  4. Reablement usually begins in hospital, but people can be referred from the community, by general practitioners (GPs) and social workers.
  5. A multidisciplinary team activates a reablement plan with clear objectives and an analysis of intended outcomes. The team might be organised around clusters of practices, with combined health and social care input.
  6. Flexibility and reassessment throughout the intervention period is necessary, with a view to improving independence and self-care after an illness.
  7. People using reablement services should be consulted, to assess satisfaction and quality of life.

Full Text Link

Reference

Reablement: implications for GPs and primary care. London: Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) / Clinical Innovation and Research Centre of the Royal College of General Practitioners, March 2012. (SCIE At a Glance No.53).

Reablement: a Guide for Families and Carers

This guide, produced with Carers UK, has been covered previously.

Full Text Link

Reference

Reablement: a guide for families and carers. London: Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) / Carers UK, March 2012. (SCIE At a Glance No.54).

Reablement for Home Care Providers (Making the Move to Delivering Reablement)

Making the move to delivering reablement explains how home care providers can move from traditional home care services to new reablement services. This guide, produced with the United Kingdom Homecare Association (UKHCA), shows:

  1. Reablement is a priority for both central and local government.
  2. Reablement offers positive outcomes for people who use services, service providers and commissioners.
  3. Reablement is about helping people learn the skills they need for daily living to help them re-gain a measure of independence.
  4. Home care managers should work with commissioners to develop opportunities for reablement.
  5. The “culture” of working needs to change for reablement to happen. The people providing reablement services should receive specialist training.
  6. A flexible approach to outcomes-focused work is required when commissioning reablement.
  7. Reablement reflects the importance of tailoring support to individuals i.e. personalisation.

Full Text Link

Reference

Reablement: Making the move to delivering reablement. London: Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) / United Kingdom Homecare Association (UKHCA), March 2012. (SCIE At a Glance No.56).

Note: Commissioners use the Fair Access to Care (FACS) criteria to assess eligibility in different ways. Some models support people who use services with mental health problems, dementia or end of life care needs, while others exclude them. Home care managers need to discuss this with commissioners. This area needs to be reviewed regularly to ensure inclusive and non-discriminatory care and support is offered.

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in ADASS, Carers UK, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), National, Personalisation, Proposed for Next Newsletter, Quick Insights, SCIE, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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