Acute Care Toolkit 4: Delivering 12-hour, 7-day Acute Medical Unit Consultant Input (Royal College of Physicians)

Summary

This is the fourth in a series of acute care toolkits. This toolkit, “Acute care toolkit 4: delivering a 12-hour, 7-day consultant presence on the acute medical unit”, supplies practical guidance for hospital managers and clinical staff on organising acute medical services. The aim is to ensure a 7 day week 12-hour consultant presence in order to achieve consistent high-quality care for acutely ill patients (and minimise the impact of the “weekend effect” in hospital mortality rates).

This toolkit covers the consultant staff numbers required, the number of patients to be reviewed per shift, and suggestions for the optimum organisation of services.

Full Text Link

Reference

Acute care toolkit 4: Delivering a 12-hour, 7-day consultant presence on the acute medical unit. London: Royal College of Physicians, October 2012. 6p.

There are three appendices:

  1. Appendix 1: Example calculation of numbers of patient contacts per day.
  2. Appendix 2: Calculation of programmed activities for direct clinical care on the AMU.
  3. Appendix 3: Example rotas.

Acute Care Toolkit 5

In November 2012 the RCP released a fifth toolkit about how to combine teaching and learning on acute units:

Full Text Link

Reference

Acute care toolkit 5: teaching on the acute medical unit. London: Royal College of Physicians (RCP), November 2012. 6p.

Implementing NICE Public Health Guidance in the Workplace

Also released in November 2012 was the RCP’s report calling for a board-level lead in every NHS trust to take responsibility for staff health improvement and wellbeing.

Full Text Link

Reference

Implementing NICE public health guidance for the workplace: a national organisational audit of NHS trusts in England. London: Royal College of Physicians (RCP), November 2012. 77p.

There is also an Executive Summary.

Acute Care Toolkit 6

In May 2013, the RCP released their 6th toolkit about the recognition of the altered physiology induced by ill-health and the appropriate responses. Certain clinical situations, termed clinical red flags, define a patient at high risk; and these need not be associated with altered physiology.

Full Text Link

Reference

Acute care toolkit 6. The medical patient at risk: recognition and care of the seriously ill or deteriorating medical patient. London: Royal College of Physicians (RCP), May 2013.

Acute Care Toolkit 7

In October 2013, the RCP released a seventh toolkit, about improve the care of cancer patients admitted to hospital as an emergency. These patients need access to cancer specialists quickly, so NHS trusts require acute oncology services which can work with their acute medical units.

Full Text Link

Reference

Acute oncology on the acute medical unit. Acute care toolkit 7. London: Royal College of Physicians (RCP), October 2013.

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
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