Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults: the MOBILIZE Boston Study (American Geriatrics Society)

Summary

The authors of this article investigated the prevalence of pharmacological (PS) and nonpharmacological (NPS) pain management approaches for older adults with persistent pain, and the characteristics associated with use of these approaches in the Boston, Massachusetts, area. It was found that just one-third of older adults with persistent pain reported pain management strategies consistent with current guidelines. Further research is needed into choices, barriers to adherence, and the benefits of multiple modalities used by older adults with persistent pain use.

Full Text Link (Note: This article requires a suitable Athens password, a journal subscription or payment for access).

Reference

Stewart, C. Leveille, SG. [and] Shmerling, RH. [et al] (2012). Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults: The MOBILIZE Boston Study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2012, Vol.60(11), pp.2081-2086. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
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