Antipsychotic Prescribing for Dementia Patients Declines in UK (BMJ Open)

Summary

A cohort study into the pattern and trends in the use of antipsychotics and antidepressants etc. in Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias has discovered that antipsychotic prescribing by GPs did fall markedly from 20% in 1995 to around 7% in 2011.

Analysis of data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) between 1995 and 2011 indicates that there was a decline in antipsychotic use after the initiation of memantine. The decline in GP prescribing of antipsychotics to patients with dementia in the community appears to have coincided with a growth in antidepressant use in the same patient group, from roughly 11% in 1995 to around 26% in 2011.

Full Text Link

Reference

Martinez, C. Jones, RW. [and] Rietbrock, S. (2013). Trends in the prevalence of antipsychotic drug use among patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias including those treated with antidementia drugs in the community in the UK: a cohort study. BMJ Open, January 7th 2013, Vol.3(1), e002080. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

[A version of this item features in Dementia: the Latest Evidence, Volume 3 Issue 6, February 2013].

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Antipsychotics, Community Care, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Management of Condition, Mental Health, National, NHS, Pharmacological Treatments, Quick Insights, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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