Pressure Ulcer Treatment Strategies: Comparative Effectiveness (AHRQ / Annals of Internal Medicine)

Summary

A high quality systematic review has been published recently on the treatment of pressure ulcers. Readers may opt to read either the study report in full, or a summary version (two articles) in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

“Moderate-strength evidence shows that healing of pressure ulcers in adults is improved with the use of air-fluidized beds, protein supplementation, radiant heat dressings and electrical stimulation”.

Low evidence supports alternating-pressure surfaces, hydrocolloid dressings, platelet-derived growth factor, and light therapy.

Full Text Link (a)

Reference

Saha, S. Smith, M.E.B. [and] Totten, A. [et al] (2013). Pressure ulcer treatment strategies: comparative effectiveness. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 90. (Prepared by the Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10057-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 13-EHC003-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, May 2013.

Full Text Link (b)

Reference

Beth Smith, M.E. Totten, A. [and] Hickam, D.H. [et al] (2013). Pressure ulcer treatment strategies: a systematic comparative effectiveness review. Annals of Internal Medicine. July 2nd 2013, Vol.159(1), pp. W1-W14.

Full Text Link (c)

Reference

Chou, R. Dana, T. [and] Bougatsos, C. [et al] (2013). Pressure ulcer risk assessment and prevention: a systematic comparative effectiveness review. Annals of Internal Medicine. July 2nd 2013, Vol.159(1), pp. 28-38.

[A version of this item features in Dementia: the Latest Evidence Newsletter (RWNHST), Volume 3 Issue 8, July 2013].

There is a recent review on patient risk factors for pressure ulcers:

Coleman, S. Gorecki, C. Nelson, E.A. [et al]. (2013). Patient risk factors for pressure ulcer development: systematic review. International Journal of Nursing Studies. July 2013; 50(7): 974-1003. Full Text Link.

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Acute Hospitals, Community Care, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), International, Management of Condition, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Practical Advice, Proposed for Next Newsletter, Systematic Reviews and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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