Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards: Practice Guidelines (SCIE Report 66)

Summary

This SCIE report covers good practice in the management and implementation of Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards  (DoLS). It is concerned with how to protect the human rights of vulnerable people, whether in hospitals or care homes, and also covers the perspectives of supervisory bodies, assessors and authorisers.

The roles of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and local authority governance are considered, with examples of good practice and tools for the evaluation of practice. It shows a collection of what good practice in the implementation of DoLS looks like.

Full Text Link

Reference

Griffiths, R. and Nieland, K. (2012). SCIE Report 66: Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards: putting them into practice. London: Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), October 2013. Adults’ Services SCIE Report 66.

The section headings in this report cover:

  • Introduction.
    • The importance of the Mental Capacity Act.
  • Use of DoLS in hospitals.
    • Introduction.
    • The Bournewood judgement.
    • Winterbourne View and Mid Staffordshire Hospital.
    • DoLS and the experience of people who use services.
    • DoLS and the MCA 2005.
    • Applying DoLS in practice.
    • DoLS and the care plan.
    • Working with the local authority as the supervisory body.
    • When to seek authorisation.
    • What is deprivation of liberty?
    • Working with people who use services.
    • Working with IMCAs.
    • ‘No contact’.
    • Mental health settings.
    • The role of CCGs.
  • Use of DoLS in care and nursing homes.
    • Introduction.
    • The Bournewood judgement.
    • Winterbourne View and Mid Staffordshire Hospital.
    • DoLS and the experience of people who use services.
    • DoLS and the MCA 2005.
    • Applying DoLS in practice.
    • DoLS and the care plan.
    • Working with supervisory bodies.
    • Restriction and restraint.
    • When to seek authorisation.
    • What is deprivation of liberty?
    • Working with residents.
    • Working with IMCAs.
    • ‘No contact’.
    • Human rights-based practice.
    • Local authorities: commissioning for compliance.
    • Supervisory bodies: roles and responsibilities.
    • Introduction.
    • What makes a good supervisory body.
    • Compliance with the legal and regulatory framework.
    • Timescales: good practice.
    • Audit.
    • Assessors.
    • Support for managing authorities.
    • Examples of proactive practice.
    • When an authorisation comes into effect.
    • Purpose of an authorisation.
    • Support for people who use services and their representative.
    • The use of IMCAs within the Safeguards.
    • Relationships with safeguarding teams.
    • Core duties of the supervisory body.
    • Equivalent assessments.
    • Peer support.
    • Emerging practice for supervisory bodies.
    • Wider local authority strategy based on learning from DoLS.
  • Assessors and assessments.
    • Mental health assessment (standard form 6).
    • Mental capacity assessment (standard form 7).
    • Eligibility assessment (standard form 9).
    • What makes a good authoriser.
    • Limitations of the authoriser’s role.
    • Scrutiny of assessments.
  • Appendix 1: Tool for audit of supervisory bodies.
  • Appendix 2: Mental health assessment quality monitoring sheet (Gloucestershire).
  • Appendix 3: Best interests assessment audit form.
  • Appendix 3: Ordinary residence in relation to hospitals.
  • Appendix 3: The hospital is situated in Wales.
  • Appendix 3: The hospital is situated in the area of an English local authority.
  • References

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Mental Health, National, Quick Insights, SCIE, Standards, UK, Wales and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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