Eldest Age Group’s Ambulance Trips to Accident and Emergency Rising Disproportionately (BBC News)

Summary

The number of over-90s taken to A&E by ambulance in England has risen by 81% over the past three years, rising from approximately 165,910 in 2009-10 to 300,370 during 2012-13. 

Overall 999 trips to A&Es, for all age-groups, rose by 11% over the same period to just under 4.4 million. The observed trend, with the largest rise in A&E attendances occurring in the oldest of old age groups, implies that possible underlying sources of the problem may lie with the availability of adequate social care and a lack of community-based alternatives to emergency hospital attendances and admissions.

Read more: BBC News. Over-90s ambulance trips ‘up 81% in three years’.

Reference

Triggle, N. (2014). Over-90s ambulance trips ‘up 81% in three years’. London: BBC Health News, January 29th 2014.

The 6th annual publication of the Accident and Emergency (A&E) Attendance data within Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) covers the period April 2012 to March 2013. It covers over 18 million detailed records of attendances at major A&E departments, single specialty A&E departments, minor injuries units and walk-in centres in England.

Read more: Health & Social Care Information Centre.

Reference

Accident and Emergency Attendances in England – 2012-13. London: Health and Social Care Information Centre, January 28th 2014.

This relates to:

Full Text Link

Reference

Accident and Emergency Attendances in England: 2012-13. London: Health and Social Care Information Centre, January 28th 2014.

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Acute Hospitals, BBC News, Commissioning, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, National, NHS, Quick Insights, Standards, Statistics, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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