Biomarker Assessments in Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical Trials (Quintiles / Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience)

Summary

Accurate and sensitive tools are required for the early detection / diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease, particularly to assist research. Alzheimer’s Disease clinical trials make increasing use of biomarkers, particularly neuroimaging markers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers obtained via invasive lumbar puncture.

The following Quintiles review examines the use of these biomarkers in twelve trials conducted / monitored by Quintiles. The majority of subjects and / or their carers typically decline to participate in lumbar puncture as the procedure is invasive. The authors discuss how compliance with biomarker assessments required by clinical and preclinical trials can be improved.

Full Text Link

Reference

Hughes, L. Hayduk, R. [and] Vanbelle, C. (2013). Integrating biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease trials: review of compliance with biomarker assessments in Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials. [United States]: Quintiles, September 2013.

Possibly also of interest, there is a more theoretically-oriented article:

Full Text Link

Reference

Gomez-Ramirez, J. Wu, J. (2014). Network-based biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease: review and future directions. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, February 4th 2014, 6, 12. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
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