Minimising Restrictive Interventions (Department of Health)

Summary

Restrictive interventions include a variety of approaches which limit an individual’s movement, liberty and / or freedom to act independently. “Positive and proactive care: reducing the need for restrictive interventions” provides a framework for adult health and social care services to build a culture where restrictive interventions are used as the last resort only. This report identifies steps to improve the quality of life of patients, so often avoiding the need for restrictive interventions.

“The report identifies actions that will improve people’s quality of life which should then reduce the need for restrictive interventions. It sets out ways to know who is responsible for making these improvements, including effective governance, transparency and monitoring… The guidance is for commissioners of services, executive directors, frontline staff and all those who care for and support people”.

Read more: Positive and Proactive Care: reducing restrictive interventions.

Reference

Positive and proactive care: reducing restrictive interventions. London: Department of Health, April 2014.

Full Text Link

Reference

Positive and proactive care: reducing the need for restrictive interventions. London: Department of Health, April 2014.

There is also an Executive Summary.

Advertisements

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Acute Hospitals, Commissioning, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Integrated Care, Management of Condition, Mental Health, National, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Patient Care Pathway, Person-Centred Care, Practical Advice, Quick Insights, Standards, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.