Living Spaces for People Living With Dementia and Sight Loss (University of Stirling and Thomas Pocklington Trust)

Summary

Research from Stirling University, published by the Thomas Pocklington Trust, shows that good design of living spaces can improve the lives of people living with two common conditions which often occur together: dementia and sight loss.

Evidence-based guidelines have been established to help make homes more accessible for people with both conditions, incorporating views of many professional groups and the experiences of people living with dementia and sight loss, their families and carers. Appropriate environmental design can improve the independence, safety and quality of life for people with dementia and sight loss.

Full Text Link

Reference

Bowes, A. McCabe, L. Dawson, A. [and] Greasley-Adams, C. (2014). Good practice in the design of homes and living spaces for people living with dementia and sight loss. London: Thomas Pocklington Trust, June 2014. Research Findings, No. 42.

The full guidelines are available in MS Word format:

Full Text Link

Reference

Greasley-Adams, C. Bowes, A. Dawson, A. [and] McCabe, L. (2014). Good practice in the design of homes and living spaces for people with dementia and sight loss. London: University of Stirling and Thomas Pocklington Trust, June 2014.

[A version of this item features in Dementia: the Latest Evidence Newsletter (RWNHST), Volume 3 Issue 12, July 2014].

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Assistive Technology, Community Care, Enhancing the Healing Environment, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), Housing, Integrated Care, Management of Condition, Models of Dementia Care, National, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Patient Care Pathway, Personalisation, Practical Advice, Quick Insights, Scotland, Standards, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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