Investigating Activity, Nutrition and Hydration Among People With Dementia in Care Homes (Bournemouth University / Burdett Trust for Nursing)

Summary

Research in Dorset care homes conducted by Bournemouth University, funded by the Burdett Trust for Nursing, has revealed significant individual variations in physical activity, possibly relating to observed variations in calorie and fluid intake among people with dementia.

Daily food intake was found to range between 700 – 3,000 kcal per day. Fluid intake levels fluctuated similarly widely, between 372 ml and 2,025 ml per day. The Body Mass Index of participants varied, with 40% of residents being classified as underweight.

Levels of physical activity (involving measures of total energy expenditure, sleep duration and physical activity), monitored using Sensewear™ Armband technology, revealed wide variations, with sedentary inactivity ranging between 6 and 23.7 hours per day.

There are indications that poor sleep patterns and lack of physical activity may contribute to inadequate nutrition and hydration. This research is hoped to offer insights into providing better nutrition and hydration for people living in care homes.

Full Text Link

Reference

Dignity in dementia: new research reveals the challenges of providing good nutrition in care homes. [Online]: Bournemouth University; funded by the Burdett Trust for Nursing, July 22nd 2015.

Further background information on this project is available:

Full Text Link

Reference

Understanding nutrition and dementia. [Online]: Bournemouth University; funded by the Burdett Trust for Nursing, 2015.

Publications in Progress

Recent international presentations by the same team, and advance notification of publications in progress:

Murphy, JL. Holmes, J. [and] Brooks, C. (2015). The Use of Wearable Technology to Measure Energy Expenditure, Physical Activity and Sleep Patterns in Dementia. In: AAIC (Alzheimer’s Association International Conference), Washington, D.C. July 2015. To be published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Murphy, JL. Holmes, J. [and] Brooks, C. (2015). Understanding the strategies required to meet hydration needs of people living with dementia. In: AAIC (Alzheimer’s Association International Conference), Washington, D.C. July 2015. To be published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Murphy, JL. Holmes, J. [and] Brooks, C. (2015). Measurements of energy intake and expenditure in people with dementia living in care homes: the use of wearable technology. In: International Academy of Nutrition and Aging (IANA) Meeting, Barcelona, Spain. June 2015. To be published in Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging.

An earlier event:

Murphy, JL. Holmes, J. [and] Brooks, C. (2014). Understanding nutrition and dementia – evidence based learning to enhance dignity in dementia care. In: Dementia: Improving quality through collaboration across Wessex event, Southampton. October 2014.

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Charitable Bodies, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Management of Condition, Models of Dementia Care, Nutrition, Person-Centred Care, Personalisation, Physiotherapy, Quick Insights, Statistics, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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