Public Health England Research Prioritisation Workshop Briefings (PHE / BBC News)

Summary

Public Health England (PHE)’s Research, Translation and Innovation Division held four Research Prioritisation Workshops. These events have resulted in a series of five reports exploring some issues in research, barriers and gaps in knowledge.

The Research Prioritisation Workshop series of briefings covers three topic-specific themes (concerning dementia, obesity and best start in life), and two broader cross-cutting themes about prioritisation and evaluation in public health interventions.

Dementia Research Prioritisation Workshop

Full Text Link

Reference

Dementia: workshop series to support prioritisation of research. London: Public Health England (PHE), August 13th 2015. PHE Publications Gateway No. 2015222.

Obesity Research Prioritisation Workshop

Full Text Link

Reference

Obesity: workshop series to support prioritisation of research. London: Public Health England (PHE), August 2015. PHE Publications Gateway No. 2015222.

Best Start in Life Research Prioritisation Workshop

Full Text Link

Reference

Best start in life: workshop series to support prioritisation of research. London: Public Health England (PHE), August 2015. PHE Publications Gateway No. 2015222.

Evaluation of Research Prioritisation Workshop

Full Text Link

Reference

Evaluation: workshop series to support prioritisation of research. London: Public Health England (PHE), August 2015. PHE Publications Gateway No. 2015222.

Cross-Cutting Themes in Research Prioritisation Workshop

Full Text Link

Reference

Cross-cutting themes: workshop series to support prioritisation of research. London: Public Health England (PHE), August 2015. PHE Publications Gateway No. 2015222.

Portion Size and Obesity Reduction

A recent Cochrane review indicates that the rising epidemic obesity might be tackled by reducing portion sizes; whether in supermarkets, restaurants or in the home.

Full Text Link

Reference

Gallagher, J. (2015). Portion size key in tackling obesity, says study. London: BBC Health News, September 15th 2015.

This relates to:

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Reference

Hollands, GJ. Shemilt, I. [and] Marteau, TM. [et al] (2015). Portion, package or tableware size for changing selection and consumption of food, alcohol and tobacco. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. September 14th 2015; Issue 9, No.CD011045. [Epub ahead of print].

Unhealthy Lifestyles and Cancer (WCRF)

Of the 351,000 new cases of cancer in the UK in 2013, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) asserts that 84,000 cases could have been prevented by relatively small changes in lifestyle. Roughly one-third of cancer cases in the UK might be preventable by eating healthily, exercising more and reducing alcohol / tobacco consumption. Data suggesting that 20,000 cases of breast cancer and about 19,000 cases of bowel cancer could be avoided per year.

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Reference

Healthier lifestyles ‘could cut cancer cases by a third’. London: BBC Health News, September 18th 2015.

This relates to:

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Reference

Cancer preventability statistics: estimate of preventable cancers in the UK. [Online]: World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), September 2015.

Cancer Risk From Red and Processed Meats

Consuming modest amounts of red and processed meat (one rasher of bacon per day) can increase the risk of bowel cancer?

Full Text Link

Reference

A rasher of bacon a day ‘ups cancer risk’. London: BBC Health News, April 17th 2019.

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in BBC News, Commissioning, For Doctors (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, Management of Condition, Models of Dementia Care, National, NHS, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Public Health England, Quick Insights, Standards, Systematic Reviews, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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