Senior Moments and Awareness of Memory Lapses: No Cause For Concern? (NHS Choices / Neurology)

Summary

Research in the USA indicates that the experience of memory lapses (so-called “senior moments”) may be less a cause for concern than a failing sense of memory awareness (i.e. forgetting what has been forgotten).

This study, which followed over 2,000 older adults for a period of 10 years, found that poor awareness of failing memory appears to be a warning sign of impending dementia. The 10% of study participants who were later diagnosed with dementia tended to have experienced a decline in memory awareness roughly two to three years before developing dementia.

Full Text Link

Reference

How having ‘senior moments’ may be a good thing. London: NHS Choices Behind the Headlines, August 27th 2015.

This relates to:

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Reference

Wilson, RS. Boyle, PA. [and] Yu, L. [et al] (2015). Temporal course and pathologic basis of unawareness of memory loss in dementia. Neurology. August 26th 2015. [Epub ahead of print]. (Click here to view the PubMed abstract).

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), In the News, International, NHS Digital (Previously NHS Choices), Quick Insights, Statistics, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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