Transforming Urgent and Emergency Care Services in England (Monitor / NHS England / UEC Review Team / ECIP / ECIST)

Summary

An overview of work underway to improve urgent and emergency care:

  1. Improving patient flow in the rest of the hospital.
  2. Getting a better understanding of the impact of social and community care.
  3. Supporting the mid-long term sustainability of A&E departments.
  4. Supporting efforts to tackle local issues.

Full Text Link

Reference

A&E delays: why did patients wait longer last Winter?: Next Steps. [Online]: Monitor, September 3rd 2015.

Missed A&E Waiting Times Targets: Why Patients Waited Longer Last Winter

The performance of A&E departments against the four-hour waiting-times standard was lowest in ten years last Winter. This report from Monitor, which tests ten hypotheses as to the underlying cause(s) of the problem, indicates that the main cause of longer A&E waiting times involved delays in admitting patients to other hospital departments from the emergency department. Hospitals struggled to cope with the increasing admission rates because of high occupancy rates and delayed transfers of care at the back-end.

This implies that reducing A&E waiting times can only be tackled across the wider local health and care system (not simply within emergency departments in isolation) and that solutions lie in improving the flow of patients through inpatient wards, towards patient discharge and back into the community.

The Emergency Care Improvement Programme (ECIP) has been created, based on these findings. This is a clinically led joint programme which will involve Monitor, NHS TDA, NHS England and the Department of Health working to offer practical help and support to the urgent and emergency care systems across England which are most under pressure.

Full Text Link

Reference

A&E delays: why did patients wait longer last winter? London: Monitor, September 2nd 2015.

There is also an Executive Summary in infographic format.

More detailed analysis:

Full Text Link

Reference

A&E delays: why did patients wait longer last winter?: Conclusions from the 10 hypotheses tested. London: Monitor, September 1st 2015.

The econometric analysis:

Full Text Link

Reference

A&E delays: why did patients wait longer last winter?: our econometric analysis. London: Monitor, September 1st 2015.

Safer, Faster, Better: Good Practice Guide for Local Health and Social Care Communities

The coup de grâce?:

Full Text Link

Reference

Transforming urgent and emergency care services in England. Safer, faster, better: good practice in delivering urgent and emergency care. A guide for local health and social care communities. London: NHS England / UEC Review Team / Emergency Care Intensive Support Team (ECIST), [August 2015] September 1st 2015.

January 2017 Update: Watering-Down of the Four Hour A&E Performance Target?

Almost a quarter of patients waited longer than four hours in A&E in early 2017, with 18,000 trolley-waits over four hours duration.

Full Text Link

Reference

Kirkland, F. [and] Triggle, N. (2017). Leak shows full extent of NHS winter crisis. London: BBC Health News, January 10th 2017.

Jeremy Hunt MP suggested that patients attending A&E units with more minor problems may no longer be guaranteed to be seen within four hours:

Full Text Link

Reference

Triggle, N. (2017). Jeremy Hunt casts doubt on NHS’s four-hour A&E target. London: BBC Health News, January 9th 2017.

Attempts to Improve Patient Access to GPs (and Relieve Pressures on A&Es)

The government would like GP surgeries to be open between 08:00 and 20:00, seven days a week. Some might lose some of their “additional” funding (unless they can prove there is genuinely no demand from patients).

Full Text Link

Reference

GPs urged to commit to seven-day service or lose funding. London: BBC Health News, January 14th 2017.

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Acute Hospitals, Commissioning, Community Care, Department of Health, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, Local Interest, National, NHS, NHS England, Patient Care Pathway, Quick Insights, Statistics, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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