Earlier Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease? (BBC News / Acta Neuropathologica Communications)

Summary

Recent animal research, using rats, suggests there may be a cheap and non-invasive method of detecting Parkinson’s Disease early – before symptoms develop – by identifying changes in the eye.

The same study also offers early evidence for a newly formulated version of the anti-diabetic drug Rosiglitazone as a promising neuroprotective therapeutic for Parkinson’s Disease (similarly assessed in terms of changes to retinal thickness, again in rats at least).

“Together, these findings suggest that retinal changes may be a good surrogate biomarker for PD, which may be used to assess new treatments both experimentally and clinically”.

Full Text Link

Reference

Parkinson’s could potentially be detected by an eye test. London: BBC Health News, August 18th 2016.

This relates to:

Full Text Link

Reference

Normando, EM. Davis, BM. [and] De Groef, L. [et al] (2016). The retina as an early biomarker of neurodegeneration in a rotenone-induced model of Parkinson’s disease: evidence for a neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone in the eye and brain. Acta Neuropathologica Communications. August 18th 2016; 4(1): 86.

Advertisements

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Animal Studies, BBC News, Diagnosis, For Doctors (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), In the News, Parkinson's Disease, Pharmacological Treatments, Quick Insights, UK and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s