Earlier Diagnosis of Glaucoma – and Possibly Many Neurodegenerative Diseases – By Retinal Examination? (BBC News / NHS Choices / Brain)

Summary

A fluorescent dye injected into the bloodstream may, in future, provide a convenient method of detecting glaucoma earlier – perhaps a decade before more overt symptoms and damage have had the opportunity to develop – by identifying changes in the retina during routine eye examinations.

This new imaging technique, termed Detection of Apoptosing Retinal Cells (DARC), shows early promise as a convenient biomarker for a range of other neurodegenerative diseases, possibly offering a non-invasive means of earlier diagnosis and improved monitoring of disease progression for dementia, Parkinson’s Disease, multiple sclerosis etc.

Full Text Link

Reference

Gallagher, J. (2017). Test may spot glaucoma before symptoms begin, study says. London: BBC Health News, April 27th 2017.

“This innovation has the potential to transform lives for those who suffer loss of sight through glaucoma, and offers hope of a breakthrough in early diagnosis of other neurodegenerative diseases”. Bethan Hughes: Wellcome Trust.

NHS Choices Behind the Headlines have also examined this research.

Full Text Link

Reference

New glaucoma test could save millions from blindness. London: NHS Choices; Behind the Headlines, April 27th 2017.

This relates to:

Full Text Link

Reference

Cordeiro, MF. Normando, EM. [and] Cardoso, MJ. [et al] (2017). Real-time imaging of single neuronal cell apoptosis in patients with glaucoma. Brain. April 26th 2017. [Epub ahead of print].

Advertisements

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in BBC News, Diagnosis, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), In the News, NHS Choices, Parkinson's Disease, Quick Insights, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s