Unresolved Issues of Means-Testing in the Payment For Social Care: a Recent History of the Dementia Tax (House of Commons Library)

Summary

A recent House of Commons Library briefing paper presents an overview of policy proposals and actual policies, from different Governments since 1997, concerning for how individuals with assets must pay for social care.

Unlike health services provided by the NHS, social care is not universally free at the point of delivery. People receiving local authority support are means-tested, and expected to contribute towards the cost of their care, often at excruciatingly punitive rates and incurring devastating lifetime costs. The shifting position of the current Conservative Government is placed in a longer-view historical policy context.

Full Text Link

Reference

Social care: Government reviews and policy proposals for paying for care since 1997 (England) [Summary Page]. London: House of Commons Library, June 22nd 2017. Commons Briefing Paper CBP-8000.

This relates to:

Full Text Link

Reference

Jarrett, T. (2017). Social care: Government reviews and policy proposals for paying for care since 1997 (England). Briefing Paper Number 8000. London: House of Commons Library, June 22nd 2017.

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Commissioning, Community Care, For Carers (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), For Social Workers (mostly), In the News, Integrated Care, Management of Condition, National, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Quick Insights, Scotland, Standards, Statistics, UK, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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