Review of Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Dementia-Related Agitation: Including a Brief Analysis of the Risks and Benefits of Drug Treatments (Translational Psychiatry)

Summary

A recently published literature review evaluates the best available evidence on the effectiveness of various non-pharmacological interventions for reducing dementia-related agitation. The author also briefly addresses current viewpoints on balancing the risks and benefits of pharmacotherapy in the management of agitation and other behavioural / psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD).

An anecdotal account of the author’s clinical experience is supplied.

Full Text Link

Reference

Ijaopo, EO. (2017). Dementia-related agitation: a review of non-pharmacological interventions and analysis of risks and benefits of pharmacotherapy. Translational Psychiatry. October 31st 2017; 7(10): e1250.

Other publications by Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust staff (on a wide range of subjects) appearing during the past ten years:

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About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in Acute Hospitals, Antipsychotics, For Carers (mostly), For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), Local Interest, Management of Condition, Mental Health, Models of Dementia Care, New Cross Hospital, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Person-Centred Care, Personalisation, Pharmacological Treatments, Quick Insights, Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust Authorial Affiliation, Systematic Reviews, UK, Universal Interest, Wolverhampton and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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