More on the Association Between Brain Injury and Subsequent Dementia (BBC News / Lancet Psychiatry)

Summary

A large-scale statistical study, based on Danish data, indicates that persons who suffer traumatic brain injury (TBI) tend to be 24% more likely to get dementia later on. The greatest risk appears to be for people who receive TBI aged between 20-29 years of age.

Full Text Link

Reference

Therrien, A (2018). Brain injuries increase dementia risk, study finds. London: BBC Health News, April 11th 2018.

This relates to:

Full Text Link (Note: This article requires a suitable Athens password, a journal subscription or payment for access).

Reference

Fann, JR. Ribe, AR. [and] Pedersen, HS. [et al] (2018). Long-term risk of dementia among people with traumatic brain injury in Denmark: a population-based observational cohort study. April 10th 2018. The Lancet Psychiatry. [Epub ahead of print].

An NHS Choices Behind the Headlines critical appraisal offers a sense of perspective.

“the absolute size of this risk increase is very small”.

Full Text Link

Reference

Brain injury may increase dementia risk. London: NHS Choices; Behind the Headlines, April 11th 2018.

About Dementia and Elderly Care News

Dementia and Elderly Care News. Wolverhampton Medical Institute: WMI. (jh)
This entry was posted in BBC News, For Doctors (mostly), For Nurses and Therapists (mostly), For Researchers (mostly), In the News, International, NHS Digital (Previously NHS Choices), Quick Insights, Statistics, Universal Interest and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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